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Sunday, August 25, 2013

TOP TEN MOMENTS FROM BEACH BOYS' MADE IN CALIFORNIA



Made In California is the long-awaited six-cd boxset by The Beach Boys. Covering all aspects of the band’s 50+ year long career in depth, the discs take you from their first release, “Surfin’”, all the way up to tracks from their 2012 album, “That’s Why God Made The Radio”. Along the way, the listener is treated to a complete catalog overview – including hit singles, album tracks, alternate versions, and a wealth of truly unreleased material.



Packaged as a hard-bound yearbook featuring many rare photos and informative quotes from the band, Made In California is an essential purchase for Beach Boys fans. Among the many outstanding highlights, I have picked ten tracks that perked my ears up and continued to pique my interest:

10) Meant For You (Alternate Version – Disc 3, Track 3): A tantalizingly short intro to the album Friends is almost triple the length in this never before released, extended version. Featuring a set of verse lyrics sung by Brian – he didn’t forget to name check ponies AND puppies. Chalk it up to 1968!

9) Sound Of Free (Disc 3, Track 29): A wonderful Dennis Wilson single (released under the name Dennis Wilson & Rumbo) from 1970. It has never previously been released on legitimate cd, possibly because a tape source wasn’t located until this box. A feel-good track co-written with Mike Love and Carl Wilson vocal involvement.

8) Soul Searchin’ (Disc 5, Track 7): Recorded during the Andy-Paley/Don Was produced album sessions (that ultimately never turned into an album), this gem of a song was resurrected by Brian and released in his own solo version on the 2004 release “Gettin’ In Over My Head”. This version features a backing track with some mid 60s charm elements. Carl’s vocal is passionate and heartfelt and the group sound is evident in the prominent background vocals.

7) Don’t Worry Baby (Alternate Vocal Take – Disc 6, Track 3): Thanks to a recently discovered tape, an early vocal attempt by Brian of “Don’t Worry Baby” has surfaced. The vocal is single-tracked, and really shows the influence of Ronnie Spector’s vocals on Brian. Keep listening until the last seconds and you’ll hear Brian riffing on a familiar vocal refrain as used on “Hawaii” and “Little St. Nick”.

6) Sherry, She Needs Me (Disc 6, Track 6): Started in 1965, lead vocal overdubs weren’t attempted until 1977 during the “Love You” sessions. Somewhat rough, but impassioned, the song languished in the vaults until Brian released a modified version (with lyrical content help from Carole Bayer-Sager) on his 1998 solo release, “Imagination”.

5) Do It Again (Stereo Mix – Disc 3, Track 10): All previous releases of “Do It Again” in it’s single version have been presented in mono or rechanneled versions. This fresh new mix finally provides some stereo separation and a good chance to hear the individual elements of the late sixties hit.

4) You’re Still A Mystery (Disc 5, Track 8): Another tune from the Paley-Wilson sessions. This one features a thoughtful Brian vocal (which may or may not have been recorded recently), with clear contributions from Mike and Al. A nice attempt at the “Pet Sounds” style.

3) California Feelin’ (Disc 4, Track 19): The first release of a Beach Boys version of this oft-attempted track. Notable for it’s inclusion of three lead vocalists…Brian on the intro, Carl on the main lines, and Bruce on the innocent refrain.

2) Where Is She? (Disc 6, Track 9): It’s not often you get to hear a totally unreleased, new-but-old Brian Wilson tune. Featuring a sparse arrangement of keyboard, Rhythm-King percussion, and a multi-tracked vocal, this is a classic Brian Wilson song that has never seen the light of a day. One could only imagine how magnificent it could have turned out if the group had polished it and worked on it during the Sunflower era, in which it was recorded.

1) (Wouldn’t It Be Nice To) Live Again (Disc 4, Track 4): A Dennis Wilson track of mythical proportions,  this Surf’s Up outtake has been long rumored to contain some of Dennis’ best musical, lyrical, and vocal content. It doesn’t disappoint. This mid-tempo ballad features a heartbreaking lyric (co-written with Stan Shapiro) that ranks close to the heights of “Forever”. Dennis sings it smooth and takes his time with the vocal, while his brothers Carl and Brian back him up with Mike doing a classic bass vocal near the end.

Made In California is a fitting-tribute to the continuing legacy of one of America’s most iconic bands.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

DEBUT OF THE BAMBOO TRADING COMPANY



Waiting for the upcoming “Made In California” 6CD Beach Boys box? Anxious to hear some summer sounds before the end of August? Look no further – The Bamboo Trading Company is here.



This isn’t your standard California "tribute" type album - nothing of the sort. First of all, let’s clear the mystery up. The Bamboo Trading Company features:

Gary Griffin
Matt Jardine
Phillip Bardowell
Randell Kirsch
Chris English
Miami Dan Yoe

If you’re a Beach Boys fan, you’re likely to recognize most of the above names. And, yeah…Matt Jardine is indeed the son of Al. As if that wasn’t enough, the album, the self-titled album featured guest spots by THE David Marks, Dean Torrence, Beach Boys archivist Alan Boyd, and Brian Wilson Band/Wondermint member Probyn Gregory.

With a line-up like that, how could you go wrong? There’s plenty of wonderful things about this record. What I really like about it, though, is that it’s joyous. It’s forty minutes of fun.



Highlights include:

“Kitty Hawk” – a nice, laid back medium-tempo pop tune which features some tasty sitar/zither-like playing. Recalls the old B.J Thomas records of the late 60s.

“Tweet (Don’t Talk Anymore)” – a funny ode to the Twitter generation, bathed in glorious stacked harmonies and Wilson-esque percussion touches. The tempo changes a few times and the harmonies that swell around the bridge are phenomenal. “I’ll shoot you an IM to settle the score….”

“Drinkin’ In The Sunshine” brings to mind Friends-era BBs. The simple feeling of laying in the sun, perhaps on the beach with an ice cold drink? Nothing better.

Listen to “Star of The Beach” (which, according to the sleevenotes, was featured in the movie “Return of The Killer Shrews” - hmm) and you’ll hear some really nice guitar work by David Marks.

Matt Jardine turns in an impressive vocal on “I’ve Always Loved The Ocean”, with a reflective lyric about a hit maker’s younger days.

Those are only a select few – there’s half a dozen songs I haven’t even mentioned. Check them out for yourself. You can find out even more about The Bamboo Trading Company at https://www.facebook.com/TheBambooTradingCompany.

Monday, July 22, 2013

HARRY NILSSON’s RCA ALBUMS COLLECTION BOX SET TO BE RELEASED!


I can think of few artists more deserving of a mega-box set spanning a decade’s worth of material than Mr. Harry Nilsson. Sure, there have been reissues of his albums in the past, on various labels and formats, but nothing that could be called truly definitive. On July 30, 2013, that is about to change.


RCA/Legacy will release the 17-CD retrospective “The RCA Albums Collection”, featuring fourteen original albums spanning the years 1967-1977. Each of these albums is loaded with bonus goodies – and if that wasn’t enough – there are three additional discs filled to the brim with even more rarities.
 
(If you'd rather watch than read - or both - check out an exclusive unboxing of the Nilsson set:)
 

Where to begin….for a box you can hold in your hand, it’s so overwhelming. There’s so much “good” here. Let’s start with the art. The outer box is a classic tan/brown combination, featuring a picture of Nilsson in his prime on the front. It folds open to reveal seventeen mini-LP sleeves and a hearty booklet. The fourteen mini-LPs are faithful to their original vinyl counterparts, including gatefolds when appropriate. The three bonus discs have eye-catching designs by Steve Stanley (of Now Sounds fame), and fit right in with the look of the older albums.

The booklet is expertly annotated by Andrew Sandoval. Sandoval, a Grammy-nominated producer/engineer who has worked on countless projects that would interest you (as if you didn’t already own them all already…) gives a nice intro to the collection before briefing the reader on each disc in the collection, providing facts and filling details along the way. There are more than a few Nilsson pics here, too, along with the track listings of each disc with relevant writers’ credits and musician information.
 
 
 
 

The sound of this set is breathtaking – in this writer’s opinion, blowing away all previous issues of Nilsson on compact disc (or any other medium!). Mastering is by Vic Anesini – he made these recordings sound vibrant and fresh. The star of these recordings (it goes without saying) is Nilsson, and Harry’s voice shines through on each and every one of these tracks –the way it’s supposed to be. The bass is clear, the drums are punchy. Everything’s right here.

Oh, yeah – the music:

Nilsson’s first two albums on RCA, Pandemonium Shadow Show and Aerial Ballet, are represented in their stereo AND mono mixes. The mono mixes have never been available on compact disc before. You don’t have to choose which mix you like better, but it’s fun to compare the differences between each.

Harry and Nilsson Sings Newman have a variety of interesting bonus tracks. Highlights include the UK-only single mix of “Mournin’ Glory Story” on the former and “Snow”, a beautiful Newman song that didn’t make the final cut on the latter.

The Point!, Nilsson at the very top of his game, sounds better than ever – and I’m oh so glad that box set producers Sandoval and Rob Santos didn’t forget that irresistible alternate mix of the single-only “Down To The Valley”. It has even more Brian Wilson-esque touches than the 45!

Long before remix albums were hip, man, Nilsson made his (he called It Aerial Pandemonium Ballet) – and there’s a bevy on bonus tracks. Of note, five previously unreleased Italian language versions of songs from his first album, and a November 1968 BBC session with the incomparable Brian Matthew hosting.
 
 

The Schmilsson trilogy is next up – Nilsson Schmilsson, Son of Schmilsson & A Little Bit of Schmilsson In The Night. All come alive no matter what sound system you’re using – just crank ‘em up and enjoy that voice.

The remaining albums through ’77 were recorded and released during a tough time in Nilsson’s career, but there are still many gems to discover if you haven’t given them a chance. Among my favorites, “Don’t Forget Me” from the John Lennon-produced Pussy Cats; “Turn Out The Light” on Duit on Mon Dei; “Will She Miss Me?”, the last track on Sandman; the Harrison cover “That Is All” that opens AND closes …That’s The Way It Is; and Knilsson’s ear-candy ballad “Lean on Me”.

We’re not through yet. The real treat here is the bonus discs that grace the set. Divided into three discs, part one (Sessions 1967-1968) opens with the infamous demos Harry cut with Chip Douglas for The Monkees. The piano and soulful vocal reading of “This Will Be The Night” is a mind-blower. There are outtakes from the first and second album sessions here, too – including unheard gems like “The Family” - and the most beautiful remix of “Miss Butter’s Lament” that is imaginable. Baroque Pop in all its’ glory.
 

Sessions 1968-1971 picks up where the first one left off – and provides even more rarities. “You Are Here” contains perhaps the best chorus Nilsson ever wrote, and it’s been sitting in the vaults for over 40 years. Tracks from the motion picture Skidoo are here –the relevant vocal ones that Harry was involved in – so no need to buy that cd separately. Among the other unreleased pieces and alternates on this disc, a stunner is “Marry Me A Little”, a five-minute Stephen Sondheim pop opus with fantastic vocals and crystal clear sound.

The final Sessions disc has material from the Schmilsson period(s). A previously unreleased alternate of “Jump Into The Fire”, with a very different arrangement, is sure to surprise even the most die-hard of fans.
 
 

NILSSON – THE RCA ALBUMS COLLECTION is available everywhere July 30, 2013. Don’t miss this one – it’s the box set of the year.

Friday, July 19, 2013

GIRLS ON 45 - VOLUME TWO!

Back by popular demand, the prestigious Teensville label presents another volume of Girls on 45!!!! Covering a four year span (1963-1967), this disc takes the listener through a wide variety of 60s female gems.
Some of the highlights include the manic Spector-like opener, Merry Clayton's "Usher Boy". I can't imagine how many musicians were crammed in the studio for this one! Likewise, "Run Johnny Run" by Ramona King takes a cue from "When You Walk In The Room (Jackie Deshannon or The Searchers, take your pick) and transforms it into something entirely different. Just listen....

Still not convinced? A late girl group bopper, "Oh I Wonder Why", as sung by The Gypsies in 1966, sports one of the catchiest call-and-responses you'll ever hear. Gwen Stacey turns in a fine rendition of cult collector favorite "How Many Times Can One Heart Break". And if you're searching for a name you know, there's Joanie Summers - but with a song you don't - the insatiable "Don't Pity Me". One of the most revelatory discoveries is not one, but TWO outstanding girlie pop tracks by one Joanne Engel. "The Boy With The Guitar" is found on the first half of the disc, and "He's Looking This Way" (my favorite on the whole disc) is presented later near the end. Here's the full track listing for your perusal:

 1. USHER BOY - MERRY CLAYTON
2. RUN JOHNNY RUN - RAMONA KING
3. I CRY INSIDE - RICKIE PAGE
4. OUTSIDE CITY LIMITS - THE CASHELLES
5. HE’S HURTIN’ ME - BEVERLY WILLIAMS
6. OH I WONDER WHY - THE GYPSIES
7. THE BOY WITH THE GUITAR - JOANNE ENGEL
8. DON’T PITY ME - JOANIE SOMMERS
9. HOW MANY TIMES CAN ONE HEART BREAK - GWEN STACEY
10. HE’LL COME BACK - SYLVIA SHEMWELL
11. CHANGED DISPOSITION - THE PARTY FAVORS
12. I’LL REMEMBER JIMMY - MISS CATHY BRASHER
13. DON’T LET IT GET YOU, GIRL - DEBBIE ROLLINS
14. WILD ANGEL - VICKI SALLEE
15. BIG MAN - BARBARA JACKSON
16. ONLY THE GUILTY CRY - CLYDIE KING & THE SWEET THINGS
17. (WILL YOU EVER BE MY) STEADY BOYFRIEND - APRIL YOUNG
18. SWEETLY AND COMPLETELY - GEORGETTA BANKS
19. AFTER LAST NIGHT - THE REV-LONS
20. STRANGER IN MY ARMS - LYNNE RANDELL
21. THEN CAME HEARTBREAK - THE REASONS
22. HE’S LOOKING THIS WAY - JOANNE ENGEL
23. MR. MAGIC MOON - THE GLEAMS
24. YOU’RE MY BABY - THE CAROLINES
25. YOU’RE NOT THE GUY FOR ME - ERNESTINE ANDERSON
26. DON’T SAY GOODBYE - JEAN KING

The cover art is extravagant & colorful (what else do you expect from Teensville?) and the booklet is expertly annotated by Ash Wells & Mike Edwards. You'll like the way it sounds, too - all of the punch of the original 45s without the snap, crackle, and pop. What are you waiting for????? Order GIRLS ON 45, VOL 2 at the RRR Store. Just click RIGHT HERE. I dare ya. Rock on....

Friday, March 22, 2013

THE HEART (AND SOUL!) OF KENNY CHANDLER

Here at Rare Rockin’ Records, one of our all-time favorite teen artists from the 60s is Kenny Chandler (real name: Ken Bolognese). Mr. Chandler has had a long and varied career, and although his music is only a small part of it, Kenny is such a nice person that he immediately agreed to answer some questions for the blog when we asked. It was a privilege to speak with him and we hope you find the article informative and interesting. Read on!



Kyler: What kind of music did you listen to growing up?

Kenny: Oddly enough, until the age of 12 I wasn’t interested in music at all. Once I heard the melodies and harmonies from the new music revolution (rock ‘n roll), I found that I could emulate those sounds vocally. I was hooked!

I found I was first inclined in grade school. I was sitting on a swing at sunset after playing basketball. The swings were just across the street from a girl I was infatuated with – but too shy to speak to. As I admired her from afar, I found myself singing “Crying in the Chapel”, a popular song by Sonny Til and The Orioles at that time. Later, I sang “Only You” by The Platters to a girl I took on a hayride. I pulled her aside, and said, “Hey, listen to this!” Her reaction changed my life forever!

These tunes were important to me as an artist and gave me the courage to step into this exciting new world as a professional singer. I was about to step into the big leagues.

Kyler: What were the circumstances of the name change to Kenny Chandler? Who decided it?

Kenny: Just before my first record on United Artists was going to be released, “Drums”, Danny Kessler came up to me. He was the business manager for Leiber and Stoller, with whom I’d hooked up with because they were a hot team at that time. Danny asked me if I wanted to use my own name on the record. Previous to this, the only solo records I had made were under the name Kenny Beau. Well….after growing up with people completely destroying my name, from Bol-Legged-Nese, Banana-Man, Mayonnaise, I’d had enough!

Also, at that time, it was in vogue to change your name. Bobby Rydell, Frankie Avalon, Bobby Darin…all changed their names. Not to mention all the actors! As I was making the drive from New York to Harrisburg the weekend after Danny asked me what name I wanted to have on the record, I wracked my brain for a new name. At that time, an actor I really liked was named Jeff Chandler. Chandler seemed to fit well with Kenny. I had a match!

Kyler: Your first record under the name Kenny Chandler was “Drums” on United Artists. Did you like the song, and how did you feel about the finished record?

Kenny: Regarding “Drums”….I was working with the best people in the business on that record. Leiber & Stoller as producers, Stan Applebaum was the arranger, Brooks Arthur – best engineer around, and one of the finest studios, Bell Sound in New York. I wasn’t happy with my vocal performance on the song, to be honest.

My manager Herb Weiner saw the potential in the song. I must admit, I didn’t! I wasn’t as schooled in other forms of music besides doo-wop; I certainly didn’t know how to pick a hit song. I depended on Herb, as he had more experience in the New York scene. I was just a kid with a dream from Harrisburg. I guess I didn’t seem to appreciate the genius of Leiber & Stoller, nor how unique the arrangement was (for that time) by Stanley Applebaum.


Kyler: Did you ever hear the Jay & The Americans version – what were your thoughts?

Kenny: Yes, I did! I was happy to see that someone else recorded “Drums”, and I would have been really happy if it had been a hit for them. It would have validated my guilt of giving a bad performance. Oddly enough, no one else had a chart record with that song. I loved Jay Black’s voice and his vocal on “Cara Mia” – just great – and “She Cried” sung by the original Jay was also wonderful.

Kyler: One thing I wanted to mention is that your records all have a unique sound to them. On some of them you sound like Roy Orbison, others like Gene Pitney – was it intentional for you to try to sound like another artist, or was that coincidental?

Kenny: The fact that you say my records had a unique sound is something….at that time, that was not in my conscious. Unfortunately, I never really understood what it meant to be original; I just loved being a part of this great new world.

It has its good and bad points. Yes, I could sound like Gene Pitney! Yes, I could sound like Roy Orbison! Yes, I could sound like Frankie Valli! I have made records that imitated many artists and therein lays the rub.

Kyler: Around the time you signed with Laurie Records, Dion left Laurie to sign with Columbia. Did Laurie sign you with the intention of them grooming you to be the next Dion?

Kenny: That is an interesting question, and it is correct. Maybe not so much “grooming” me to be the next Dion, but Laurie had me in mind to be their next male star. I recorded many of my records at Laurie with the same group that backed Dion on his solo records, The Del Satins. Some of my records from that time have a ‘Dion’ sound to them, such as “Leave Me If You Want To” and “Gonna Make You Pay”. Maybe if Dion had stuck around, he might have recorded some of those songs and not me!

I also have some great memories of touring with Carlo Mastrangelo (who became the lead singer of The Belmonts after Dion left, and they had a chart record entitled “Come On Little Angel”), two years after the Winter Dance Party tour that featured Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and The Big Bopper. We played the original Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa. Carlo was looking pale when we entered the venue. I went up to him and asked him if everything was ok. He said, “I’m freaking out, man! This is where we got the news that Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens were killed in the plane crash!!

We started the tour in Chicago and ended it in Chicago. When we were going back, many people were going to fly. I asked Carlo if he was and he just looked at me and said, “I don’t fly anymore”, for obvious reasons he didn’t have to state. I asked him how he would get back and he told me he would be taking the bus. So, I told him I would take the bus with him! We sat in the back, having a good time playing and singing our favorite doo-wop songs.







Kyler: “Heart” was your biggest hit. I know you’ve told the story before, but how did you first come across that song?

Kenny: Before I made records under the name “Kenny Chandler”, I worked with The Tree Swingers –their hit record was “Kookie Little Paradise”. I wasn’t on the record, but I was hired to do a promotion with them on tour. Art Polhemus was one of the members of that group. Jump to a couple years later, I got a call from Art. He was now a recording engineer, and he had just engineered a demo session for Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil for a song called “Heart”. He told me it was a fantastic song, and that it would be perfect for me. But, Bobby Darin was producing Wayne Newton at that time, and he had an exclusive on the song!

Eddie Mathews, who at that time was the National Promotional Director at Laurie, told me that if there was a lead sheet at the Library of Congress, anyone could record it, and sure enough, it was there. We recorded it and beat out Wayne Newton.

Bobby Darin was good friends with Dick Clark. The day I was scheduled to lip-sync “Heart” on American Bandstand, Darin used his influence to bump me from the show and have Wayne Newton on instead! Maybe if I was the one on Bandstand that day, it would have had an even higher chart placing.

Kyler: How do you feel about the Wayne Newton version compared to yours?

Kenny: I liked my record better – not my performance, though. I always loved Wayne’s voice; one of my favorite records of his is “Danke Schoen”.

Wayne and I had the same booking agent, Frank Barcelona at the GAC Agency. I’m in his office and we were just finishing up our discussion. The receptionist calls Frank and tells him Wayne Newton is waiting. Frank asked if I would like to meet him. Of course, I said yes!

We go out into the reception area and Frank introduces us. “Wayne, this is Kenny Chandler…” Wayne looked down at me (he’s a tall guy – and at that time he had the short hair, baby fat, and looked like a kid on steroids!). He said, “Oh, you’re Kenny Chandler”, very coldly – so I said, “Oh, you’re Wayne Newton”. And that was it! If it was the old wild west, we would have had a shootout! How funny.

Kyler: The B-Side of “Heart”, entitled “Wait for Me”, is one of my all-time favorites. Any memories about that?

Kenny: Even though it was a Ricky Nelson imitation, I always liked it!

Kyler: I Can’t Stand Tears At A Party – your third Laurie single - was that meant as a Lesley Gore “It’s My Party” answer record?

Kenny: Absolutely! I was personal friends with John Gluck Jr, one of the writers of “It’s My Party”. They never came back to him and the other writers of “It’s My Party” for a follow up for Lesley. My “answer song” used some of the same arrangement styles of “Party”, including the way the horns and drums sounded. It must have come out around the same time as “Judy’s Turn to Cry”. We never had a chance!

                                                                          



Kyler: “I Tell Myself” was the B side – any memories/thoughts?

Kenny: “I Tell Myself” is memorable because it was my first arrangement. I had the entire arrangement in my mind before I got to the studio. As an arranger, in the studio, with all these wonderfully creative musicians with whom I had worked with on so many sessions was incredible. Who knew a kid from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania could find himself producing a session with some of the best musicians in America and quite possibly the world…what a rush! I thought it was amazing and I learned so much. Sadly, this record never received any airplay.

Kyler: Did you sing live with the band or would you overdub your vocals after the tracks had been recorded?

Kenny: I did both! If we needed to come back, after hearing the dub, and felt we could improve it…that’s what we did. In my case, if my live performances were recorded I would have been better represented than my studio recordings. I never was happy with my studio sessions. It took me many years to learn how to be a studio singer.

Kyler: I’ve read that in 1964, you lost your voice – is that true?

Kenny: Very true. I credit Burt Bacharach for my recovery. He sent me to a great doctor who was the only one who got results. I had gone to the best doctor in the biz, Dr. Rosen – who was Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme’s doctor….nothing. It took me a year of searching until I ran into Burt and he sent me to Dr. Berberich. 6 months later my voice returned. I can’t tell you how thrilled I was. I had thought my professional singing career was over.

Sometime later I had an opportunity to thank Burt. It was at my first recording session since the loss of my voice. I saw Burt going into the men’s room at the same time I was. I had to call his name twice and he said “who is it” I said Kenny Chandler, he popped his head around the corner and said “Hey how are you” I told him I was so thankful to him for sending me to Dr. Berberbich, that I was there to do a session and that he saved my recording life. By this time, Burt had become a huge success.

Kyler: What are your favorite recordings of your own?

Kenny: I was never really happy with any of my recordings. I am very proud of my latest single, “In the Still of The Night”, which has been released through TuneCore and is available to purchase through Amazon and other internet retailers. However, I feel the best is yet to come!




I’d like to thank Kenny for taking the time to graciously provide the memories and stories for the interview.

You can buy Kenny's latest singles, "In The Still of The Night" and "Little Darlin'" on Amazon - just CLICK HERE.

Rare Rockin' Records current release is David Gates - The Early Years 1962/1967 (Songwriter Masters Series). You can purchase directly from the RRR online store....all you have to do is CLICK HERE for more information.

Until next time, rock on….

Monday, February 4, 2013

DAVID GATES - THE EARLY YEARS 1962-1967

Upcoming release from your favorite label, Rare Rockin' Records!


 
 
The next installment of the highly acclaimed Songwriter Masters Series higlights the written accomplishments of David Gates. As you may know, Mr. Gates was active in the music business long before Bread - as a recording artist, yes....but also a master craftsman of fine pop, doo wop, rock n' roll, girl group, and soul tunes. This compilation, lovingly compiled and annotated, presents 32 of Gates' finest written songs spanning the years 1962-1967. It includes songs you may know (including the smash Murmaids hit "Popsicles & Icicles"), and some you may not (including killers by The Crickets, Margaret Mandolph, and Shelley Fabares). In addition, Gates' original own demo of "You'll Be Needin' Me Baby" is included as a bonus treat - as if 32 amazing songs weren't enough!!! And if that wasn't enough information to get you salivating, here's the full track list:


 1. THE MURMAIDS - POPSICLES AND ICICLES 2. ANN-MARGRET – HEY, LITTLE STAR
3. MICHAEL LANDON - WITHOUT YOU
4. GLORIA MELBOURNE - DON’T LET HIM
5. DOROTHY BERRY – CRYIN’ ON MY PILLOW
6. DORSEY BURNETTE - PEBBLES
7. SHELLEY FABARES - FOOTBALL SEASONS OVER
8. GWEN STACEY - AIN’T GONNA CRY NO MORE
9. THE GIRLFRIENDS - MY ONE AND ONLY JIMMY BOY
10. PAT POWDRILL - THE LUCKIEST GIRL IN TOWN
11. FRANKIE FANELLI - TEARS, RAIN
12. MARGARET MANDOLPH - IF YOU EVER NEED ME
13. THE CRICKETS - PLAYBOY
14. CONNIE STEVENS - LOST IN WONDERLAND
15. DOROTHY BERRY - YOU BETTER WATCH OUT
16. JOHNNY BURNETTE - THE FOOL OF THE YEAR
17. GWEN STACEY - LONELY GIRL
18. MARGARET MANDOLPH - SILLY LITTLE GIRL
19. GAIL GANLEY - I THINK I’M GONNA CRY
20. JERRY MODINE - ARE YOU PUTTING ME ON
21. MERRY CLAYTON - NOTHING LEFT TO DO BUT CRY
22. SUZY WALLIS - TELL HIM
23. DOTTY & KATHY - THE PRINCE OF MY DREAMS
24. CARL EDWARDS - THE BRIGHTER SIDE
25. GWEN STACEY - GIVE THANKS TO A FRIEND
26. JODY MILLER - NEVER LET HIM GO
27. THE GIRLFRIENDS - FOR MY SAKE
28. THE FENCEMEN - SWINGIN’ GATES
29. JOHNNY CRAWFORD - NO ONE REALLY LOVES A CLOWN
30. DOROTHY BERRY - STANDIN‘ ON THE CORNER
31. JODY MILLER - HOW DO YOU SAY GOODBYE
32. THE LETTERMEN - YOU’LL BE NEEDIN’ ME
33. DAVID GATES - YOU’LL BE NEEDIN’ ME (ORIGINAL DEMO)




You can place your pre-order direct from us at the official RRR online store. Just click HERE!

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

GIRLS ON 45 (New Teensville CD Release)

Ladies lovers rejoyce! Teensville Records (a division of RRR) presents GIRLS ON 45, a fantastic new compact disc release featuring over an hour of 60s girl pop sounds. Since you all own the wonderful line of products already available on Teensville, I don't need to tell you the wondrous sounds to be found on this label. This newest release is no different, with 26 rare sounds for your enjoyment.
The packaging is colourful and glamorous - pictures of the artists and records are abound. Liner notes are provided by head-honcho Ash Wells and the talented Mike Edwards, chronlicling the stories and sounds so you can read as you listen. A point that's come up recently - some music fans are wary of buying material by artists they have never heard of. Well, who says unknown equals poor? In this case, it's the exact opposite! Compilers Ash and Mike have chosen to include 26 songs that weren't even close to hits - but they should have been!!! Give it a try, something new won't hurt. In this case, I promise! You'll have to buy the cd to read all about the artists and songs, but I'll provide a few of my personal fave raves from the disc: -The Emeralds' "Did You Ever Love A Guy", coming across like a brilliant lost Chiffons single. -Atmospheric and dramatic sounding "Better Off Without You" by Beverly Noble. -Hideously rare Toni Wine/Tony Powers composition "Make Me Happy", sung here by Barbara Wilson. -Italian charmer Piccola Pupa sounding like an updated female Neil Sedaka in 1965 on "Put Two Extra Candles On My Candles". It was co-written by Howie Greenfield, no wonder. -Vi Valesco's "If You Must Break A Heart" from her Vee-Jay album, in stereo no less! They're all good, though, and I urge you to support a great label and a great product by purchasing GIRLS ON 45 (on cd!)(or official mp3 download!). Links below for your convinience: CD Purchase Link: CLICK HERE MP3 Download Purchase Link: CLICK HERE